Can I Sue My Employer If I Am Hurt At Work?

In most cases, workers' compensation is your only source of recovery if you are injured on the job. In exchange for providing workers' compensation benefits, employers are generally protected from being sued by employees for workplace injuries. However, there are exceptions.

At Duffield, Lovejoy, Stemple & Boggs, Attorneys at Law, in Huntington, West Virginia, we offer a free initial consultation to evaluate your work injury case and discuss your options. Even if another lawyer has told you that you cannot sue your employer, contact our firm for a free second opinion.

Protecting Your Rights If You Are Injured At Work

Workers' compensation benefits do not cover everything you lose in a workplace accident. For example, workers' compensation will replace only about two-thirds of your lost wages, and it provides no compensation for pain and suffering, which is typically the largest portion of a personal injury award.

Some states, including West Virginia, allow you to sue your employer if your injury was caused by deliberate intention of your employer. An example of deliberate intention would be to send you into a coal mine with known dangers or to remove a safety guard from a machine.

You can also sue a third party who is responsible for your injury. A third party is anyone who doesn't work for your employer. Examples include:

  • Other drivers in car and truck accidents
  • Manufacturers or installers of equipment
  • Manufacturers or distributors of dangerous chemicals
  • Vendors or contractors
  • Employees of other companies

Contact A Work Injury Lawyer At Our Firm

If you have been injured in an accident on the job, our experienced attorneys will work hard to help you recover the maximum compensation for a workplace injury. Please contact us today to schedule a free initial consultation.

Injured at work? We're here. Call now, day or night: 304-521-4572 or toll free: 877-262-3376.